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ROOTS AND DREAMS: TWENTY YEARS OF THE 
HUMAN SERVICES CORPORATION
 
Lillian L. Lamoureux. HSC

stability everyone hoped for has been difficult to attain in the wake of national and regional economic downturns.  And yet the city is in a stronger position in the early 1990's than it was entering the 1970's.  Historic Preservation magazine recently described Lowell as "the premier rehabilitation model for gritty cities worldwide."  The industrial architecture and ethnic heritage once viewed as liabilities have been successfully transformed into Lowell's most valued assets.  Outsiders and insiders have a more positive view of the city.  Working with leaders from the public and private sectors, the Human Services Corporation helped take a good idea down the road to reality.

     In twenty years, HSC has teamed up with a host of organizations and agencies ranging from the Ford Foundation and National Endowment for the Arts, to the Massachusetts Bicentennial Commission, VISTA, Solomon Mental Health Center, and Lesley College.  The many projects included a Summer Reading Program for the Neighborhood Youth Corps; Specialized Home Care for retarded adults; Lowell Alternative School; The Franco-Ametican Cultural Center; and Lowell City Fair.  The wide array of programs represents more than $4 million in funds raised from federal, state, and private sources.

     Members of the Human Services Corporation see themselves as part of long and continuous process of renewal and progress.  They nurture values and cultivate resources.  "We're urban gardeners and tinkerers," says long-time member Mary Bacigalupo.  "You can make a difference by changing how people feel about themselves.  But your work is never done."

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