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PERSPECTIVES AND VISIONS: 
ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF LOWELL'S COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
 
State Normal School, 1899

He remained in that post until 1908.  During that time academic foundations were laid, public relations established, and a genuine affection for and loyalty to the school and its mission were engendered in students, faculty, and the community.

     As expressed by the State, the sole purpose of the school was the preparation of elementary school teachers for public schools in Massachusetts.  The standard course of study was two years in length, but in so far as the facilities would permit, an elective third or fourth year was available.  So too were special courses for experienced teachers and college graduates.  There was a special program for students who elected the kindergarten course. In 1910, a three-year course in music was initiated.

     Conforming to State requirements, Lowell established a training school where the aspiring teachers might observe and practice their recently acquired teaching skills.  The Bartlett School, one of Lowell's newest and finest, made twenty-seven rooms available.  The principal of the school, Cyrus A. Durgin, later became the Normal School's second principal (1909-1915).  Before 1910, additional training schools began operation in Lawrence and at a rural school in North Tewksbury. 

     While the Normal School bore that name, two other principals presided John T. Mahoney (1916-1922) and Clarence M. Weed (1923-1931).  In 1932, the school's name was changed to State Teachers College at Lowell.  Unofficially, the school was referred to as Lowell Teachers College.  School publications  from the period bear that title, and memorabilia from that time is initialed LTC.  A beautiful stained-glass window in the entrance hall of today's Coburn Hall displays "LTC." 

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