CENTER FOR LOWELL HISTORY UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWELL LIBRARIES

Home     Digital Photographs     Genealogy Resources     Special Collections     Search
 
POLONIA: THE GREATER LOWELL 
AMERICAN COMMUNITY PAST & PRESENT
 
funeral parlor and, much later, a store occasionally sold Polish speciality foods.

Very soon, national fervor and religious ardor would become the driving forces behind the need to build a church.  It was felt that the Roman Catholic hierarchy was slow in responding to requests for a Polish parish.  The growing Polish community's formal religious life first took place in St. Joseph's Church on Lee Street.  Saint Joseph's, however, was a French Catholic church.  Struggling to adapt to a new world, Lowell's Polonia found itself seriously divided.  One small group appealed to the newly formed Polish National Catholic Church of Scranton, Pennsylvania, for leadership, and became affiliated with this church, forming St. Casimir's Parish.  Their first church, erected in 1901 in Belvidere, was later sold to St. Joseph's Lithuanian Paris.  In 1911, under the pastorship of the Rev. Paul Kuznik, a new church was consecrated on the site of the present St. Casimir's Church in Centralville, where a majority of the new parishoners had settled.  A significant number of Poles from Centralville and nearly all Poles living in Belvidere, remained Roman Catholic and were the pioneer families of Holy Trinity (Polish) Parish.  The Holy Trinity Church was consecrated in 1904.  Saint Stanislaus School, the first Polish parochial school in the archdiocese, opened in 1907.  Msgr. Alexander Ogonowski was Holy Trinity's first

Top Of Page    Previous Page or Next Page