CENTER FOR LOWELL HISTORY UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWELL LIBRARIES

Home     Digital Photographs     Genealogy Resources     Special Collections     Search
  
BEDROCK, BRICKS, AND ROCK DOVES: 
THE NATURAL HISTORY OF LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS
 
Freeman Ballard Shedd

     Private efforts have also contributed greatly to the city's need for green spaces.  In the 1850's the Northern Canal Walkway, offering a panoramic view of the Pawtucket Falls, was built by the Proprietors of Locks and Canals as a promenade for mill workers.  In, the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, when shorter working hours and more leisure time created a greater demand for parks, private citizens responded by donating large parcels of land to the city.  Rogers Fort Hill Park, Shedd Park, the Pawtucket Boulevard, Tyler Park, Sheehy Park, and Gage Field were all constructed on land donated to the city by prominent, civic-minded individuals.

     Today the City of Lowell is itself designated as a National and State Park.  The ancient bedrock of the Pawtucket Falls, which once attracted Pennacook Indians to fish, now attracts visitors who come from throughout the world to see the mills and canals built as a result of the 30-foot drop.  Local parks, built to ease the congestion of a growing industrial city, are now focal points of neighborhood pride.

Top Of Page    Previous Page or Next Page