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150 YEARS OF HEALTH CARE: 
ANNIVERSARY QUILT AND 19TH CENTURY MEDICAL INSTRUMENTS
 
     Father Louis Bachand, central figure in negotiating the transfer of the hospital as a gift from the Lowell corporations to the Catholic diocese, became Saint Joseph's first president and served on the board for 35 years.

     Sister Alphonse Rodriguez, Grey Nuns of the Cross of Ottawa, credited with the revitalization and expansion of the hospital, assumed the challenge of managing and staffing the deteriorating institution as Saint Joseph's first administrator

     Homer W. Bourgeois, leading Lowell Banker and concerned philanthropist, directed the expansion of Saint Joseph's facilities and services while President of the Hospital's Board of Directors from 1965 to 1977.

     The squares at the top of the quilt are logos or, designs of the order of the Grey Nuns of the Cross of Ottawa; cardiology and other diagnostic services; and the support auxiliary "Family of Saint Joseph's Hospital."

     The squares along the right side of the quilt illustrate the hospital's roles: books = education of the community in medical and health care; tree = intertwining clinical and support services; Saint Joseph's logo = Catholic community hospital; rainbow and children = commitment to all cultures and ethnic communities.

     The squares along the bottom of the quilt present the Family Birth Unit logo = family centered maternity services; nurses = Lowell's first School of Nursing 1887-1969; kidney dialysis patient = leadership in providing dialysis services throughout the Merrimack Valley.

     The squares along the left side of the quilt show Saint Joseph and the Christ Child = the hospital's patron saint; ambulance = the emergency department and outpatient clinics; Staff of Aesculapius = symbol of medicine and healing; Bachand Hall = Lowell landmark and current residence of the Grey Nuns.

     Patterns in the borders of the quilt symbolize the canals and waterwheels of Lowell, important steps in providing power to the mills for the production of textiles.

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