CENTER FOR LOWELL HISTORY UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWELL LIBRARIES

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LAWRENCE TEXTILE WORKERS THROUGH THE GENERATIONS
 
     In addition to scenes from the beach, people preserved memories of other special events in their family albums.  These events may have included renting a barge on a Sunday afternoon or taking a special girl out for a ride in a buggy.

     One theme shown in the exhibit is the shift from production of goods to their consumption.  The albums of the Incollingo, Cadoret, Umpa, Amid, and Champy families are good examples of this.  Many immigrants living in Lawrence, especially those from Eastern and Southern Europe, tended to have fruit and vegetable gardens.  These were often at summer homes or houses on the outskirts of Lawrence where the family would spend weekends, away from work and the environment of the mills.  While this type of agriculture was considered to be work in Europe, in the United States it became a form of leisure activity.  This pattern of production continued into the 1940s with "Victory Gardens."  It gradually disappeared after World War II when edible plants were replaced with flowering plants and pine trees in many gardens.

Umpa family apple picking

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