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A GARDEN OF GRAVES: VIEWS OF LOWELL CEMETERY
 
of hope, as if in chorus whispering, "not dead, but sleeping."

     Near the end of the nineteenth century, naturalism was becoming too overdone.  Natural stone monuments began cropping up everywhere.  The August 27, 1894 edition of the Lowell Evening Mail addressed this issue in a lengthy story on the Talbot lot, which is unmarked except for a protruding piece of natural ledge stone upon which is cut the word TALBOT and is simplicity in the extreme, but very expressive in this instance.

     The article then describes other natural stone monuments and concludes with the observation that they are all marked in good taste, the only fear being that the idea being copied extensively may be overdone.

     Cemeteries like Lowell and Laurel Hill did not become the rage in all areas of the nation.  As described earlier, they are almost exclusively linked to urban centers.  Thomas Bender writes, As the nation became increasingly urban, city people tended to romanticize nature.  Only an urban society can afford such romanticizing: in a frontier society trees are not scenic; they are potential houses.

Lily Monument

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