CENTER FOR LOWELL HISTORY UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWELL LIBRARIES

Home     Digital Photographs     Genealogy Resources     Special Collections     Search
 
FOLK ART
 
paintings dated after 1834 appear to have been 
done only by Ruth. 

     Ruth immediately returned to Concord, New 
Hampshire, where Samuel was buried.  In 1840, 
Ruth married Alpha Tarbell and they moved to 
Louisville, Kentucky.  The Tarbells had two 
daughters. Ruth continued to paint, mainly 
family portraits and a few Civil War scenes from 
accounts of major battles such as Gettsysburg. 
During this time, her style evolved from 
primitive folk art to paintings that clearly 
resembled their subjects.  Ruth died on 
September 26,1882. 

The Style
The Shutes' work can be divided into two 
periods.  Little is known about the first period, 
(1827-1831), except that the two artists generally 
work separately.  These earliest paintings are 
very primitive.  Of the twenty-five paintings 
which are identified from this period, fifteen are 
by S.A. Shute and ten are by R.W. Shute. 
However, they eventually developed an 
unusual style, both working on the same piece 
of art. Ruth usually did the drawing and 
Samuel the painting.  This collaboration marked 
the second period and dates from sometime in 
1831 until mid 1833. 
 
     Most of the Shutes' finest work is found 

 
Cynthia Bicknell Atkinson
  

 Top Of Page   Previous  or  Next Page