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FROM ERIN TO THE ACRE
 
Everyone had a nickname and everyone knew everyone else.  Weekends might bring out the sound of a fiddle or an accordion, and there were always the wakes and funerals with top hat and cape.  Also, there were the mandatory festivities on St. Patrick's
Day, always beginning with Mass, a parade through
the city, and a feast at home.  Some children were given lessons in step dancing, while others were taught the old songs for the St. Patrick's Day shows at the Auditorium.  Today, many of the same families can be seen at events during Irish Cultural Week, and the work and play of this community still carries on as it has for over 150 years. 

The Irish presence within the Acre has not vanished. The idea of remembering the past and passing on the culture is as important today as it was to those first inhabitants.  Our definition of what the Acre is was passed down to us through stories and photographs. Many events in the Acre today reflect the joys and sorrows of what happened to those early people.  It is the story of a people seeking a home and  identifying with a special place called the Acre.

Bibliography
Karas, Nicholas, Greek Immigrants at Work,
     LHPC, 1986.
King, William, The Acre: 1941-1951, Lowell, MA,
     Sullivan Bros., 1988. 
McKean, David, "A Neighborhood and its People:
     The Story of the Acre, " LHPC, 1990.
Mitchell, Brain, The Paddy Camps: The Irish of 
      Lowell, 1821-1861, University of Illinois Press, 
     1986
O'Dwyer, George, Irish Catholic Genesis of 
     Lowell, (reprint), Lowell Museum, 1981.
Leo Panas & Anne Quinn, The Irish Came to
     Lowell, LHPC, 1985.

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