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STRONG LIGHT AND OPEN SPACES
 
Engraving of sailboat
 
Engraving of sail boat
 
     John Coggeshall came to maturity during this exciting and bewildering time of change for the arts in America and in Lowell.  As a practitioner of painting, photography and engraving, Coggeshall comfortably reconciled traditional American landscape painting with these new visual technologies.

HIS WORK

Painting
Although he sketched from nature from the age of nine, John Coggeshall never attended art school.  He felt compelled to learn a trade due to family financial difficulties.  But once he had established his engraving firm in Lowell, there was time to pursue his first love, painting.

     It was the French Barbizon and Munich painters who attracted American interest and American money in the last quarter of the nineteenth century.  American painters hoping to sell their art imitated these popular European styles and techniques.  John Coggeshall was strongly influenced by William Phelps, whose European training favored the tonal quality of the Barbizon School combined with the looser paint handling characteristic of the Munich School.  The paintings were representational, and Coggeshall, like most American painters of this period, preferred marine and landscape subjects over the historical and genre themes of his European counterparts.

     Coggeshall's palette became brighter as he was exposed to artists who returned from European studies, but he never wholeheartedly embraced impressionism.  He was most representative of those American painters who straddled the middle ground between the Hudson River School and 

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