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STRONG LIGHT AND OPEN SPACES
 
When John Ingersoll Coggeshall arrived in Lowell in 1877, he was surprised to find a thriving arts community. The 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia had whetted American appetites for the pictorial arts, and the people of Lowell were no exception.  The artist David Neal had returned to his native Lowell after teaching in Munich and his presence here attracted other gifted artists like Walter Shirlaw. William Preston Phelps, a promising young painter from New Hampshire, arrived in 1880.  The Lowell Art Association was chartered in 1878, and the exciting young field of photography, was represented by the Camera Club, established in 1892.  Coggeshall, an avid painter and photographer, joined both of these organizations.  He had also recently finished an engraving apprenticeship in Boston and came in Lowell to work with James E. Rice in his engraving firm at 31 Central Street.  John Ingersoll Coggeshall truly typified the American Renaissance man of this period.  His energies, interest and abilities ranged over a variety of artistic activities.  He embraced both the yearning for nature embodied in American landscape painting, and the fascination with new technology symbolized in photography and engraving.

John I. Coggeshall

  
Portrait: John I. Coggeshall

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