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CHAPEL HILL
 
1879 Map of Lowell
   
Detail, 1879 Atlas Page.
This section of an atlas printed for the City of Lowell in 1879 
illustrates how densely settled Chapel Hill was by the late 
19th century.  Most of the buildings were small frame 
dwellings, with a few brick structures located along the 
major streets. The soap factory near North Street was the 
only non-textile industry in the neighborhood. Note the 
narrow courts leading from Charles Street, allowing access 
to buildings erected on rear lots.  A row of similar houses 
erected after 1845 Locks and Canals land auction can be 
seen on Walnut Street.
 
 
 

Hosford Square
 
 
 

  
Cady Street
  
  5.  Cady Street.
A network of short narrow cross streets lined with houses 
abutting the sidewalk connects the main north-south arteries 
of Chapel Hill (Lawrence, Central, Chapel and Gorham 
Streets).  Many of these were in place as early as 1832, 
and much of Chapel Hill’s uniqueness is derived from 
these early pedestrian-oriented passageways.
 
  6.  Hosford Square.
At the junction of Mill, Wamesit, Elm, Richmond and 
Central Streets is Hosford Square, named after Hocum 
Hosford, a prominent mid-19th century Chapel Hill 
Resident. The square offers welcome open space amidst 
the tightly built-up streets.  Along its perimeter are 
examples of every architectural style in the 
neighborhood. 
  
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